disc sports

Disc Sports is An Ageless Game

Dan “Stork” Roddick, who has been throwing a frisbee for 55 years, talks about what he likes about disc sports and why he still loves it so much.

The unique thing about flying disc is that there are so many areas that you can go into based on your physicality, your friends or your stage in life. You can literally play from the time you’re 2 until you’re 102. Ultimate frisbee, disc golf, guts, dog disc, ddc, distance, self caught flight, gollum, goaltimate, freestyle, accuracy, discathon and more.

Passion vs Obsession

Some would say there’s a fine line between passion and obsession. First of all, what is the difference?

I found a great explanation that I will use here to frame the rest of this post.

Passion – when people admire you for it

Obsession – when you do it too much and people think you’re weird

However, how does one truly impact an industry, a culture, a generation without people thinking they’re weird? Especially when what you choose to be passionate about/be obsessed with is different from what everyone else is doing.

Future of Disc Sports

In this video Dan “Stork” Roddick gives his thoughts on what the future of frisbee will look like. He doesn’t think that disc sports should be commercialized like other sports – pods that exists in all areas which allow people to play seem to be the best way.

Dan “Stork” Roddick is a long-time disc sport champion and organizer in both the U.S. and internationally.

Stork was an early star of the game of Ultimate with college champion Rutgers University (with a record of 45-1), where he was Irv Kalb’s favorite scoring target, and he was a winner of national and world championships in individual events including disc golf, freestyle and accuracy.

The Evolution of Disc Sports

Prior to 1968 there was no cohesive unified “Frisbee’ culture, and really no discs sports per se.  Regionally isolated pockets of Frisbee activity existed all over the country ranging from casual tossing and catching to relatively organized and structured games and contests.  But none of these occurrences of Frisbee activity knew about the existence of each other.

John “Friz Whiz” Kirkland

John “Friz Whiz” Kirkland

A tremendous all-around competitor, Kirkland was voted the disc athlete of the seventies. He won the men’s World Overall Championships in 1977 and finished second on three other occasions, as well as winning several individual world titles.

He is still very active in the scene and continues to inspire future world champions.