dan roddick

First College Ultimate Game

Dan “Stork” Roddick talks about how he got into ultimate and shares his experience playing in the first college ultimate frisbee game in 1972.

Dan “Stork” Roddick is a long-time disc sport champion and organizer in both the U.S. and internationally. Stork was an early star of the game of Ultimate with college champion Rutgers University (with a record of 45-1), where he was Irv Kalb’s favorite scoring target, and he was a winner of national and world championships in individual events including disc golf, freestyle and accuracy.

The Ten Commandments of Frisbee

as told by Dan “Stork” Roddick

I
The most powerful force in the world is that of a disc straining to land under a car, just beyond reach. This force is technically called “car suck”.

II
The higher the quality of a catch or the comment it receives, the greater the probability of a crummy throw. (Good catch = bad throw.)

III
One must never precede any maneuver by a comment more predictive than, “Watch this!” (Keep ’em guessing.)

IV
The higher the costs of hitting any object, the greater the certainty it will be struck. (Remember: the disc is positive – both cops and old ladies are clearly negative).

Future of Disc Sports

In this video Dan “Stork” Roddick gives his thoughts on what the future of frisbee will look like. He doesn’t think that disc sports should be commercialized like other sports – pods that exists in all areas which allow people to play seem to be the best way.

Dan “Stork” Roddick is a long-time disc sport champion and organizer in both the U.S. and internationally.

Stork was an early star of the game of Ultimate with college champion Rutgers University (with a record of 45-1), where he was Irv Kalb’s favorite scoring target, and he was a winner of national and world championships in individual events including disc golf, freestyle and accuracy.

The Evolution of Disc Sports

Prior to 1968 there was no cohesive unified “Frisbee’ culture, and really no discs sports per se.  Regionally isolated pockets of Frisbee activity existed all over the country ranging from casual tossing and catching to relatively organized and structured games and contests.  But none of these occurrences of Frisbee activity knew about the existence of each other.