college ultimate

Recruiting for Your College Team

It’s that time again! College captains are scrambling to find those eager athletes to join their squad. As a captain of a small school, I can assure you, it’s pretty difficult to find recruits. People are joining organizations left and right. What’s gonna make them want to join a team that throws plastic back and forth with each other? They could go Greek, join a different club sport, or just focus on their studies. How can you, as a team, convince rookies to join the Ultimate team on campus – which will surely be the best decision they’ll ever make. Here are a few of the recruitment strategies I’ve found useful over the years.

Why You Should Play Club Ultimate

Or more specifically…why college players should play club ultimate.

Playing Ultimate shouldn’t be reserved just for half of the year. The feeling of skying someone who has been talking trash the whole day, getting to lay out for the winning goal and have grass stains infect your white jersey, and those long, game-filled car rides can’t be limited to just the College Spring Season. What an injustice to the sport. That is why God has given us one of the greatest gifts of all time: Club Season.

On Beginnings

I’ve been having a lot of conversations with college players as they process the end of their season and begin regrouping for whatever comes next.  As tough as endings can be, with them come new beginnings, and those can be tough as well. It’s a bit hard to summarize all of my thoughts on this topic, especially as I struggle through endings and beginnings myself, but I thought I’d share a bit of Melee ’08 with you as your team begins the next part of its journey.

First College Ultimate Game

Dan “Stork” Roddick talks about how he got into ultimate and shares his experience playing in the first college ultimate frisbee game in 1972.

Dan “Stork” Roddick is a long-time disc sport champion and organizer in both the U.S. and internationally. Stork was an early star of the game of Ultimate with college champion Rutgers University (with a record of 45-1), where he was Irv Kalb’s favorite scoring target, and he was a winner of national and world championships in individual events including disc golf, freestyle and accuracy.