Practice

Articles about practice

Training Hex offence with your team

 

Hex is a new offence which most of your team will not have seen or played before – introducing it can be both fun and exciting, but will certainly come with its challenges. I’ve had experience introducing the offence to a variety of teams and players, from primary schools through University level teams to GB, and along the way have learned plenty about how to make the introduction as enjoyable and productive as possible. I hope to share what I’ve learnt with you in this article.

Freestyle the “Ultimate” Edge

(A fast-freestyle playing exercise/guide for learning and practicing disc handling skills used in ultimate)

In the early days of Frisbee before disc sports, the original attraction was just to watch the Frisbee fly. At first, this was enough; the sheer joy in watching the Frisbee fly, not at all like a ball. Then, because it’s in our nature to compete, came the Frisbee games. If you enjoy playing one disc game, chances are you’ll enjoy all the disc games, because they all have that one common attraction: unlike the ball, the disc actually flies. Each game demands unique skills but also shares common skills used in other games. If you become skilled in one disc game, you’ll quickly excel and most likely enjoy participating in other disc games.

10 Tips for a Rookie Handler

When I was learning to play Ultimate, I didn’t have a coach, mentor, or Ultimate Rob videos. I had to teach myself the game and whenever my friends learned something new, we’d spread the knowledge with each other. I was one of the slower learners on the team and required as much assistance as possible, so putting me on the handler line wasn’t the best option. I was a cutter by default. When I came to college, my throws were naturally better than most because I had been playing for a while, and my team was brand new. So my journey began from moving from a cutter to a handler – yet again without a mentor. Teaching myself this aspect of the game was incredibly difficult. Here are 10 guidelines for rookie handlers that helped me learn to be a handler.

Indian National Youth Camp – Day 3

25th May 2014

Day 3 was spent in preparation for the upcoming tournament which starts in a day.  The teams had two session of Ultimate as usual. The morning was spent doing the drills that was part of the curriculum. In the evening however the coaches had the freedom to devise their own training plan according to what the coaches thought was needed for their team. Many teams choose to run drills that ended in scrimmage with another team. The afternoon was spent painting T-shirts that would serve as jerseys.

Indian National Youth Camp – Day 0

This is a quick introduction to the first ever National Ultimate Youth Camp at Surat, India.

The Ultimate Camp at Surat is the first of its kind in India. It’s a gathering of about 130 adolescents and 30 coaches for 5 days. These are Beginner to Intermediate level players and they’ve come from all across the country with no universal language for communication. These campers are going to be split into teams of 10 with 2 coaches to facilitate.  The camp covers the basic skills and strategy needed to play structured ultimate, like throwing, cutting, vertical stack, Defensive skills and handler movement.

10 Things Every Captain Should Know

Captaining my Ultimate team has been the most stressful job of my college career. Forget the midterms, forget the finals, forget about juggling my job, school, church, and girlfriend. But no matter how stressful the role was, the payoff was always worth it. Over my few years of being a captain, I’ve learned the ropes. Here, ladies and gentlemen, are the 10 things every Ultimate captain should know.

1. You’re the face of your franchise

Effective Coaching of Drills

As an intermediate player I used to wonder why our captains and coaches insist on running the same drills over and over again. Frankly, I found it boring! I assumed drills, like warming up and stretching, was a waste of time. I used to be all about the scrimmage at the end of the training session. I slacked off during drills, didn’t really focus on what I was doing. To me, then it was about doing enough reps before the captain/coach let me play ‘actual’ Ultimate.

Why You Should Play Club Ultimate

Or more specifically…why college players should play club ultimate.

Playing Ultimate shouldn’t be reserved just for half of the year. The feeling of skying someone who has been talking trash the whole day, getting to lay out for the winning goal and have grass stains infect your white jersey, and those long, game-filled car rides can’t be limited to just the College Spring Season. What an injustice to the sport. That is why God has given us one of the greatest gifts of all time: Club Season.

Forehand Mechanics That Aren’t Taught

The best way to describe throwing a forehand is comparing it to a vertical jump. As we know, vertical jumping ability is directly influenced by the speed of the force exerted against the ground during a fixed span of time; the faster the application of that force, the higher the jump. To translate this concept into throwing a forehand, we can infer that the less time it takes to apply a given amount of snap to the disc, the more rotations will be yielded per ‘x’ amount of time. With this, if you look at an exceptional thrower like Alex Thorne, you’ll notice that he has one of the quickest releases out of any thrower in the nation. Furthermore, those quick releases all generally look more or less the same, regardless of the distance of the throw. Such quick releases coupled with a strong snap provide for a throw that will fly through the air with very little observable disruption from wind.

Improving Horizontal Offense Initiation Plays

Receiving a pull is an area in which a team should be extremely proficient, as it is an event that occurs hundreds of times over a season. It is a mistake to not take advantage of these moments in which the defense is not entirely set. The ideal situation occurs when the offense initiates play from the brick and scores a seemingly effortless, or uncontested, goal.

Zen Throwing Routine Video

The Zen Throwing Routine, developed by Ben Wiggins, is a combination of a group of exercises that he found to help develop his own balance and versatility in throwing. He was inspired to put this into a cohesive form as a partner-slash-alternative to Lou Burruss’ Kung Fu Throwing, which is a very effective plan with very different goals.

To view all of the 21 steps in the Zen Throwing Routine, visit the playlist here: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLezzWvSJAw_Y9WqN4bE1v6EzatYqh2d0M.

You can download the complete Zen Throwing workout here: http://bit.ly/zenthrowing.

What is balance?

Deposits in the Bank

Former Australian cricketer, Adam Gilchrist, hits the nail on the head in his biography ‘True Colours: My Life’.

Gilly explains beautifully about how pushing yourself in training and in practice games is akin to making ‘deposits in the bank’. He cites the example of how they once chased down 315 runs (a big score then!) He says that it was a very useful ‘memory’ to be stored away in preparation for a world cup because if they ever found themselves chasing a challenging score in the world cup, they wouldn’t be lost. They would know what exactly to do because they have been in that situation before. The confidence that they could draw from it was immense.

Kung Fu Throwing Video Tutorial

Kung Fu Throwing is a system developed by Lou Burruss and Mike Caldwell in 2005. He wanted to come up with a structured throwing plan to help developing throwers. As the only two Seattle Sockeye players who lived on Capitol Hill at the time, Mike and Lou would meet often to throw. Lou solicited Mike to help him with this and to their surprise they found that it was an excellent system for established throwers. (They were in their 7th and 9th years on Sockeye.) They did KFT once a week the entire season and Lou’s throws were more consistently on than any other year.

Frozen Squirrel – Play of the Week

This week’s play of the week from Playspedia is called the Frozen Squirrel. I like it for the name and for it’s ability to score on a zone. The best takeaway from this play is to realize in order to get a good deep huck on a zone, you first need your deeps to come under. Nothing will stifle a zone offence and take away the huck threat more than players hanging out deep.

The play breaks down as follows:

  1. Middle handler throws to open side handler
  2. Break side handler (1) sprints to opposite sideline to catch throw

3 Person Weave – Drill of the Week

The 3 person weave drill is great for faking, handler movement, cutting to open space, resetting and seeing the field. The progression is as follows:

  • 3 handlers line up horizontally
  • 2 cuts up the line, 3 moves in, 1 fakes the pass to 2
  • 1 passes to 3, 2 cuts across the field
  • 3 passes to 2, 1 slides up the field
  • 3 Handlers are back in horizontal
  • Repeat the pattern: 3 cuts up the line, 1 moves in, 2 fakes the pass to 3
  • 2 passes to 1, 3 cuts across the field

Capitals Ultimate 2013 Season Outline

We’ve been working with USA Ultimate on the new Triple Crown Tour (TCT), as well as Caps from the 2012 fall season to put together an exciting 2013 strategy and schedule.  This is a little different than years in the past but was built to take into consideration a lot of factors with a focus on 2 key objectives:

  1. Ensure a strong Capitals team will participate in the 2013 TCT, keeping the spot we fought hard to earn last fall!
  2. Ensure the opportunity for players to participate on Caps and on their respective club teams.

Zone Defense Analysis

Thanks to Ben Greene for breaking down this defense during the January 2011 USA Ultimate Level II clinic in Chapel Hill, NC.

This presentation attempts to answer the following questions about zone defense:

  1. What are the advantages for the defense in terms of space? What are the threats for the offense?
  2. What disc position is most advantageous for the defense? For the offense?
  3. What (lack of) thrower skills bring advantages for the defense? What skills bring the offensive threats?
  4. Under what field conditions does the defense have the advantage? … does the offense have threats?

Out Practice Your Opponents

The great thing about ultimate is that as much as your individual skills matter, at the end of the day, it’s still a team game. But, one of the ways you can help your team out is by practicing your disc skills. Throwing, catching, reading, faking. You don’t need to be with your team to work on those skills. Just think if everyone on your team spent a few hours each week working on disc skills. After a few months, your team would be a much better team since your foundation would be much more solid.

Team sports remind me of this quote: