Plays

Training Hex offence with your team

 

Hex is a new offence which most of your team will not have seen or played before – introducing it can be both fun and exciting, but will certainly come with its challenges. I’ve had experience introducing the offence to a variety of teams and players, from primary schools through University level teams to GB, and along the way have learned plenty about how to make the introduction as enjoyable and productive as possible. I hope to share what I’ve learnt with you in this article.

Exercise Caution With Set Plays

About 5 years ago, I was at a practice for the men’s team I was on. We were working on a particular play. What I’ll never forget is how regimental our play practice was. Literally we were working on player movement as precisely as a few feet rather than having general lanes and letting the offensive players run their lanes based on the positioning of the defense. It felt more like a choreographed dance than a play that contained room for variety within each lane or cut.

Effective Coaching of Drills

As an intermediate player I used to wonder why our captains and coaches insist on running the same drills over and over again. Frankly, I found it boring! I assumed drills, like warming up and stretching, was a waste of time. I used to be all about the scrimmage at the end of the training session. I slacked off during drills, didn’t really focus on what I was doing. To me, then it was about doing enough reps before the captain/coach let me play ‘actual’ Ultimate.

The Mexican Offence

Many of you are familiar with the vertical, horizontal and spread offence but not many of you have heard about the Mexican Offence. It’s relatively new and was developed by Felix Shardlow from Brighton Ultimate in 2012. It’s not for every team but depending on the types of players you have, this might be a good system for your team to incorporate. Here is a video showing the Mexican offence in action: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j01Py8Jl6N8 and more can be found on the Hexagon Ultimate  YouTube channel.

Improving Horizontal Offense Initiation Plays

Receiving a pull is an area in which a team should be extremely proficient, as it is an event that occurs hundreds of times over a season. It is a mistake to not take advantage of these moments in which the defense is not entirely set. The ideal situation occurs when the offense initiates play from the brick and scores a seemingly effortless, or uncontested, goal.

Storm – Play of the Week

This week’s play of the week from Playspedia is called Storm. This play, used on a brick pull, is really simple yet I feel that it would be quite effective. Since the cutter is striking deep on the break side, the defender will keep an eye on them but will probably play off a bit. When the deep strike suddenly cuts to the open side, deep, I could imagine that it would catch many defenders off guard. I think it’s worth trying but would probably only work once per game unless you’re playing a team who doesn’t pay attention.

  1. Set up from brick mark

Frozen Squirrel – Play of the Week

This week’s play of the week from Playspedia is called the Frozen Squirrel. I like it for the name and for it’s ability to score on a zone. The best takeaway from this play is to realize in order to get a good deep huck on a zone, you first need your deeps to come under. Nothing will stifle a zone offence and take away the huck threat more than players hanging out deep.

The play breaks down as follows:

  1. Middle handler throws to open side handler
  2. Break side handler (1) sprints to opposite sideline to catch throw