Furious George vs DoG – 2002 UPA Semis

Considered by many as the greatest ultimate game of all time, Furious George took on DoG (Death or Glory) in the semi-finals of the 2002 UPA Club Open Ultimate Championships.

In a game that saw only 5 turnovers (including just 1 turnover in the second half), Furious George would go onto defeat DoG and eventually beat Ring of Fire in the finals to claim the 2002 UPA Open title.

How To Prevent Getting Burnt Out

Danielle Fortin, a World Champion and 3 time Canadian Champion, talks about one of the problems facing high level ultimate with more players getting into the sport at a younger age. She also relates her experience when she felt burnt out and how she was able to rediscover her passion in the sport. This is a great video to start the dialogue among players and coaches and for individuals to take a look at their own game when they feel like they’ve lost their desire to play.

If you can’t view this video, watch on youtube here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-QPYWbtiPXM.

Mario O’Brien From Rise Up Ultimate

Mario O’Brien, Producer and Creative Director at Rise Up Ultimate, talks about his inspiration for creating Rise Up. Mario is a teacher by trade so he’s ensured that all episodes of Rise Up are pedagogically sound. He also gives us some info on what is in store for the future of Rise Up including clinics and more sessions where they teach the coaches.

You can find out more about Rise Up at: http://www.riseupultimate.com.

If you can’t view the video, watch it on Youtube here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bbk-AVL_904.

Elliot Trotter on Skyd Fund 2014

Donate to Skyd Fund 2014: http://igg.me/at/skydfund2014/x/739699.

Elliot Trotter, founder and editor-in-chief of Skyd Magazine, talks about Skyd Fund 2014.

Skyd is celebrating 3 years of providing the ultimate community with a place for valuable analysis, insight, video and coverage. Since 2010, Skyd has acted as a voice for the community, communicating new ideas, announcing exciting new ventures and providing a platform for new contributors.

Skyd pioneered consistent and reliable tournament and season coverage and has changed the way we present ultimate media. Since its inception, Skyd’s mission has been to grow the sport by enlightening and inspiring through informative and reliable media coverage. In doing so, we’ve brought our community closer together and strengthened its future.

How To Deal With Getting Cut

Elliot Trotter, founder and editor-in-chief of Skyd Magazine also plays for the Seattle Rainmakers in the MLU.

From the time he started playing in college, he’s been cut many times and sometimes from teams he thought he should make. Most notably he’s been cut from Seattle Sockeye 6 times, never making it past the first round of cuts. Hear him talk about how he learned from those failures to help push him to become a better player. As he says, perhaps the only way to learn is through failure. This is a great video if you’ve ever been cut, have just been cut or are about to try out for a team and would like some perspective going into tryouts. Sometimes a team is looking for a certain type of player – that doesn’t mean you’re not a good player; sometimes you’re just not what they’re looking for.

Interview with Michelle Ng

I sat down with Michelle Ng, co-founder of Without Limits. I asked her what her inspiration for starting Without Limits was, what winning the Kathy Pufahl Spirit Award meant to her, what makes all of her hard work worth it, and if she thought there was going to be a pro women’s ultimate frisbee league.

Find out more about Michelle and what Without Limits does at http://www.withoutlimitsultimate.com.

If you can’t view the video above, click this link to watch on youtube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D31VyW49U_U.

Long Term Athlete Develop -ment Plan

Danielle Fortin, a world champion and 3-time Canadian champion in ultimate frisbee and the current Development Programs Coordinator at Ultimate Canada.

Danielle talks about the Long-Term Athlete Development plan or LTAD, which Ultimate Canada will soon be posting on the website and distributing to the various organizations across Canada.

You can find out more information on http://canadianultimate.com.

If you can’t see the video above, please click this link to watch on youtube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WP4NmXI_2TU.

Forehand Mechanics That Aren’t Taught

The best way to describe throwing a forehand is comparing it to a vertical jump. As we know, vertical jumping ability is directly influenced by the speed of the force exerted against the ground during a fixed span of time; the faster the application of that force, the higher the jump. To translate this concept into throwing a forehand, we can infer that the less time it takes to apply a given amount of snap to the disc, the more rotations will be yielded per ‘x’ amount of time. With this, if you look at an exceptional thrower like Alex Thorne, you’ll notice that he has one of the quickest releases out of any thrower in the nation. Furthermore, those quick releases all generally look more or less the same, regardless of the distance of the throw. Such quick releases coupled with a strong snap provide for a throw that will fly through the air with very little observable disruption from wind.

Handling and Marking Q&A From a Fan

This post was in response to a fan who had a few questions about handling and marking both on offense and defense.

Rob,
I’m a combination handler/cutter for I just had a few questions about handling against tight marks and vice versa, marking tough handlers.

I’ve only been handling for a few months, and I’ve found that in the three tournaments I’ve played at I feel like I’m usually just cycling the disc back to an upline handler or dump rather than making throws to cutters. I’ve only turned the disc once across those three tournaments while handling, which I guess is good but most of the throws I have made haven’t been that long of a throw to get turned, if that makes any sense.

Throwing Techniques for Ultimate: A Study

Abstract

The goal of this study was to determine if certain throwing techniques for the sport of Ultimate Frisbee were advantageous relative to other techniques. The defense can attempt to force a thrower to utilize a specific throw; knowing the advantages of different throws can influence a defender’s decision to force the thrower to use a certain throw. Motion capture was used to monitor the flight of a disc (Discraft Ultrastar 175g) for three throwing techniques. The two main groups of throws were backhand (BH) and forehand (FH) throws, with the forehand throws divided into a closed forehand grip (CF) and a split forehand grip (SF). Sixteen participants were recruited with experience ranging from 3 years to 8 years based on survey. Throws were analyzed with regards to linear velocity, angular velocity, precession, and accuracy. Players threw a total of 45 throws: five throws for all combinations of the three throwing techniques combined with three objectives: accuracy, maximum spin, and maximum velocity. The order of the nine throwing groups was randomized. Throws were analyzed for linear velocity, angular velocity, precession, and accuracy. Linear velocity was calculated by measuring the distance traveled in the first 0.02 seconds of flight, and angular velocity was measured by calculating the time required for four unique points on the disc to complete one rotation. precession was measured by calculating the average angular deviation from the average normal plane of the disc, and accuracy was measured by the distance between the center of the disc and the target at closest approach using a quadratic fit to the known flight path. There was a very strong linear correlation between linear velocity and angular velocity. There was no difference in linear velocity between backhand and forehand throws, although the closed grip forehand had a higher linear velocity than the split grip forehand. Backhand throws had higher angular velocities than forehand throws for a given speed; there was no difference in angular velocity between closed grip and split grip forehand throws.

Poker Players Get Into Ultimate Frisbee

Get to know Leif Force and Phil Laak 

In an article published on Slate, it states there that 4.7 million Americans played Ultimate Frisbee at least once in 2010. It also revealed that more than 1.5 million people play this sport at least 13 times a year, and those devotees tend to spend money on Ultimate. Based on the statistics, it is not surprising if some of those frisbee aficionados happen to be well-known poker players. One person that was proud to admit that he was into frisbee was Leif Force, or also known as “Jungle Boy”, who is a WSOP gold bracelet winner.

The Little Things

I’m headed into my 7th event of the season, my 5th of five in a row.  I’ve basically been on the road since Thanksgiving, most of my stuff is in a friend’s garage, and the rest of my worldly possessions are in my car. Those who know me on a personal level know that this is not how I roll AT ALL. I have a graduate degree in Planning, and nothing in my life is planned right now. I’m not even sure where I’m sleeping tomorrow night.

But in the midst of a time of insanity and uncertainty, I’ve tried to remind myself that…

Tips for O Line Handlers

This post was inspired by a question on facebook from one of my fans. Let me know if you have any questions related to o-line handling.

Q: Hey bro,could you give me some pointers on how to be an O-Handler?

A: Sure thing! Here are some tips on being an O-line handler:

1. Your role as a handler is to move the disc up the field and score a point. What this means is that your biggest focus should be on valuing the disc. You cannot score if the other team has the disc. So, you should only be throwing high percentage throws (a 50% throw is not a high percentage). Think 75% or higher. Ideally you should be throwing to a cutter who is open, within the range of a throw you can consistently throw.

How Lottery Made a Difference

How Lottery Made a Difference in the Frisbee Community

Millions of people play the lottery with the hope of winning huge amounts of money. Just imagine how much these lottery companies earn from all the tickets bought each day. If you feel bad because you weren’t one of the lucky winners, then try Bitcoin Loophole Review and not to dwell on that negative emotion. Think of it as an act of charity because these lottery companies give back to the community including Frisbee groups – either by giving funds or sponsorship.

Improving Horizontal Offense Initiation Plays

Receiving a pull is an area in which a team should be extremely proficient, as it is an event that occurs hundreds of times over a season. It is a mistake to not take advantage of these moments in which the defense is not entirely set. The ideal situation occurs when the offense initiates play from the brick and scores a seemingly effortless, or uncontested, goal.

Uncommon Throws in Ultimate Frisbee

Along with the most common throws in ultimate, we have the ability to throw a bunch of other throws which aren’t very common or never ever used in a game…but they’re throws and learning to throw them is a good way to improve your snap, your field awareness and your overall throwing ability. I would not recommend using these throws in a game, unless absolutely necessary.

The throws are, in order:

  • Behind the Back Backhand
  • Behind the Back Forehand
  • Between the Legs Backhand
  • Around Both Legs Backhand
  • No Look Backhand
  • No Look Forehand