About Ultimate Rob

Rob McLeod is a disc sports competitor, a 12 time World Record holder (including 6 Guinness World Records), 10-time World Champion, 2 time Quadruped title holder and currently holds the Canadian Distance Record. He created ultimaterob.com in 2009.

7 thoughts on “What is Spirit of the Game?

  1. There are two things that make Spirit of the Game a valuable part of Ultimate Frisbee.First, there is no intent to injure other players in Ultimate. No bodychecking, elbows thrown, tripping, etc. Incidental contact occurs, but no intentional flagrant fouls taking place behind the view of the 'referees'.Second, I love the fact that it is common practice to congratulate an opponent on a great play or effort on a play. Shows the best of sportsmanship and respect for everyone's abilities on the field.

  2. Hey Ultimate Rob–you know I like your stuff, but I think you kind of missed the point on this one. Spirit of the Game goes well beyond just knowing the rules of ultimate. I think that, crucially, it entails both respect for the rules and respect for your opponents. And the reason to respect both of those things is because it makes for a better game that everyone will enjoy playing more.

    I can give you an example of what I thought was great spirit from a tournament I played in a couple of months ago. I got beat deep on two successive plays by a player who was more experienced (and, quite frankly, more talented) than me. After his second score, we both came off the field and happened to be standing around the same spot, so I told him he had made a nice catch, or something to that effect. He modestly pointed out that I had almost picked it off, and I responded by saying that “Well, yeah, but even though I knew you were going deep right from the start, you still beat me.”

    He paused a moment and then started explaining to me what I could do to prevent a player from making a deep cut. I was pretty astonished. I would never expect an opponent to go out of his way to give me an advantage–especially in the middle of a game–and yet he did. But that’s what ultimate spirit is about: not doing whatever you can to win the game, but doing whatever you can to make everyone’s game better, even if that means that you’ll have to become a better player yourself.

  3. @swinters Steve, you make a great point, and I love how you said that “…that’s what ultimate spirit is about: not doing whatever you can to win the game, but doing whatever you can to make everyone’s game better, even if that means that you’ll have to become a better player yourself…”

    I agree with your comment but I don’t feel that I missed the point. Coming from a sports background my entire life, I see elements of Spirit in every sport I’ve played. Some more than others. However, I do feel that it all starts with knowing the rules and developing a respect for yourself and your team first, and then for the other team. Having started off as a beginner in ultimate and very quickly moving to competitive ultimate, what you speak of doesn’t really happen in men’s. Sometimes there are glimpses for sure, but although we don’t do whatever we can do win, we also don’t do whatever we can to make everyone’s game better.

    Thanks for your comment! You bring up a great perspective 🙂

  4. It was at that Calgary indoor “competitive” tournament a couple of months ago. So not the typical tournament setting, I suppose. But still an exemplary display of sportsmanship, as far as I’m concerned.

    And I don’t mean to out anyone, but it was your friend Ty who did it. And for all I know, you might have thrown one or both of those discs. 🙂

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